The Student News Site of East Grand Rapids High School

The East Vision

The medical debate: vaccinations

Hannah Stuursma, Staff Writer

Imagine a school full of unvaccinated, disease-prone children playing with the same toys during school.  

Imagine a child being diagnosed with whooping cough because one parent disagreed with the powerful vaccinations that have been proven to save many children’s lives.  

One child is all it takes to spread a dangerous disease throughout a school and possibly into a community.  One child can close down a school and put teachers, administrators, and custodians without work.  One child can put hundreds of kids and adults in immense danger.  

Students should be required to have vaccinations — no exceptions.

Parents are opting out of vaccinations for many reasons; reasons that are not backed up with scientific evidence.  Some parents believe vaccinations are dangerous and can have harmful effects.  For example, parents believe use of vaccinations can lead to autism.  The substance in the vaccines that were said to cause autism have since been removed from the vaccines, therefore giving the autism theory no scientific evidence.  Furthermore, the substance had no link to autism.  The substance was only extracted to end the myths and fears of vaccinations being linked to autism.  

Vaccines are also said to be one of the safest medical tools used. Although vaccinations are a low risk tool, there is still some risk involved, as with any disease-prevention tool. Studies show very mild effects from most vaccines, such as tenderness in the arm from the injection, mild rashes, and a mild fever.  Dangerous side effects are incredibly rare in school aged kids.  Mild side effects are bearable, especially compared to a child catching a harmful disease. Vaccinated children can catch diseases from unvaccinated children just as as easily as unvaccinated children can catch from anyone else.

Also, putting children in danger means not meeting the recommended vaccinations for a school aged child.  In the state of Michigan, parents have the choice to vaccinate their child or fill out an extensive exemption form that gives parents the right to refuse vaccinations.  Exemption forms may only be used for “religious and philosophical” reasons to not vaccinate a child.

By not meeting the recommended vaccinations, the parent is not breaking the law, but they are being unfair to students in the schools.  Parents do have the right to opt out of vaccinating their children.  In some states, the public school system has the right to suspend students who are not vaccinated. This rule does not apply for the state of Michigan because there is an exemption form. Michigan and every other state should require all 28 vaccinations that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends.  Students enrolled in the public school system should not be able to opt out of the vaccinations.

A parent’s biggest fear is having their child catch a dangerous disease. There is additional fear associated with spreading the disease to other children.  Mandating vaccinations throughout the United States will help cut down on schools closing, hospitals being quarantined, and young children losing their lives because of a parent choosing to not vaccinate their child.  

 

Imagine a school full of unvaccinated, disease-prone children playing with the same toys during school.  

Imagine a child being diagnosed with whooping cough because one parent disagreed with the powerful vaccinations that have been proven to save many children’s lives.  

One child is all it takes to spread a dangerous disease throughout a school and possibly into a community.  One child can close down a school and put teachers, administrators, and custodians without work.  One child can put hundreds of kids and adults in immense danger.  

Students should be required to have vaccinations — no exceptions.

Parents are opting out of vaccinations for many reasons; reasons that are not backed up with scientific evidence.  Some parents believe vaccinations are dangerous and can have harmful effects.

For example, parents believe use of vaccinations can lead to autism.  The substance in the vaccines that were said to cause autism have since been removed from the vaccines, therefore giving the autism theory no scientific evidence.  Furthermore, the substance had no link to autism.  The substance was only extracted to end the myths and fears of vaccinations being linked to autism.  

Vaccines are also said to be one of the safest medical tools used. Although vaccinations are a low risk tool, there is still some risk involved, as with any disease-prevention tool.

Studies show very mild effects from most vaccines, such as tenderness in the arm from the injection, mild rashes, and a mild fever.  Dangerous side effects are incredibly rare in school aged kids.  

Mild side effects are bearable, especially compared to a child catching a harmful disease. Vaccinated children can catch diseases from unvaccinated children just as as easily as unvaccinated children can catch from anyone else.

Also, putting children in danger means not meeting the recommended vaccinations for a school aged child.  In the state of Michigan, parents have the choice to vaccinate their child or fill out an extensive exemption form that gives parents the right to refuse vaccinations.  Exemption forms may only be used for “religious and philosophical” reasons to not vaccinate a child.

By not meeting the recommended vaccinations, the parent is not breaking the law, but they are being unfair to students in the schools.  Parents do have the right to opt out of vaccinating their children.

In some states, the public school system has the right to suspend students who are not vaccinated. This rule does not apply for the state of Michigan because there is an exemption form.

Michigan and every other state should require all 28 vaccinations that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends.  Students enrolled in the public school system should not be able to opt out of the vaccinations.

A parent’s biggest fear is having their child catch a dangerous disease. There is additional fear associated with spreading the disease to other children.  Mandating vaccinations throughout the United States will help cut down on schools closing, hospitals being quarantined, and young children losing their lives because of a parent choosing to not vaccinate their child.

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